“There’s a trick to the ‘graceful exit.’ It begins with the vision to recognize when a job, a life stage, or a relationship is over — and let it go. It means leaving what’s over without denying its validity or its past importance to our lives. It involves a sense of future, a belief that every exit line is an entry, that we are moving up, rather than out.”
― Ellen Goodman

(photo: View from the Interior of an Abandoned Farmhouse Across Land Strip Mined by Coal Companies Near Edgewater Park, Ohio. 07/1974 U.S. National Archives: Photographer: Calonius, Erik; Documerica project)

“There’s a trick to the ‘graceful exit.’ It begins with the vision to recognize when a job, a life stage, or a relationship is over — and let it go. It means leaving what’s over without denying its validity or its past importance to our lives. It involves a sense of future, a belief that every exit line is an entry, that we are moving up, rather than out.”
― Ellen Goodman

(photo: View from the Interior of an Abandoned Farmhouse Across Land Strip Mined by Coal Companies Near Edgewater Park, Ohio. 07/1974 U.S. National Archives: Photographer: Calonius, Erik; Documerica project)