"Reading is the sole means by which we slip, involuntarily, often helplessly, into another’s skin, another’s voice, another’s soul."
-Joyce Carol Oates
(A glimpse - what a lovely word - of my shelves)

"Reading is the sole means by which we slip, involuntarily, often helplessly, into another’s skin, another’s voice, another’s soul."
-Joyce Carol Oates
(A glimpse - what a lovely word - of my shelves)

"I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them."
-Pablo Picasso

(Children’s hand prints: iphone 5)

"The wound is the place where the Light enters you."
(Rumi)

(Iphone 5 manipulated by me)

"The wound is the place where the Light enters you."
(Rumi)

(Iphone 5 manipulated by me)

The Journey

One day you finally knew
what you had to do, and began,
though the voices around you
kept shouting
their bad advice —
though the whole house
began to tremble
and you felt the old tug
at your ankles.
“Mend my life!”
each voice cried.
But you didn’t stop.
You knew what you had to do,
though the wind pried
with its stiff fingers
at the very foundations,
though their melancholy
was terrible.
It was already late
enough, and a wild night,
and the road full of fallen
branches and stones.
But little by little,
as you left their voices behind,
the stars began to burn
through the sheets of clouds,
and there was a new voice
which you slowly
recognized as your own,
that kept you company
as you strode deeper and deeper
into the world,
determined to do
the only thing you could do —
determined to save
the only life you could save.
(Mary Oliver)

(Santa Ynez Mountains; iphone 5)

"Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world."
-Voltaire

(Atlanta Ballet in the Atlanta Botanical Gardens; iphone 5)

"Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world."
-Voltaire

(Atlanta Ballet in the Atlanta Botanical Gardens; iphone 5)

“What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them.” 
― John Lubbock, The Beauties of Nature and the Wonders of the World We Live In

“What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them.”
― John Lubbock, The Beauties of Nature and the Wonders of the World We Live In

“She was almost sixty and she had not been to London, or Paris, or Rome, and there was no going there now. Yes, she was balanced, as she had gotten into the habit of congratulating herself for being. But, she saw, she was balanced on a very narrow perch.” 
― Jane Smiley, Private Life

“She was almost sixty and she had not been to London, or Paris, or Rome, and there was no going there now. Yes, she was balanced, as she had gotten into the habit of congratulating herself for being. But, she saw, she was balanced on a very narrow perch.”
― Jane Smiley, Private Life

“I don’t care about whose DNA has recombined with whose. When everything goes to hell, the people who stand by you without flinching—they are your family.” 
― Jim Butcher, Proven Guilty

“I don’t care about whose DNA has recombined with whose. When everything goes to hell, the people who stand by you without flinching—they are your family.”
― Jim Butcher, Proven Guilty

SELF-PORTRAIT AT TWENTY

By Gregory Orr


I stood inside myself
like a dead tree or a tower.
I pulled the rope
of braided hair
and high above me
a bell of leaves tolled.

Because my hand
stabbed its brother,
I said: Make it stone.

Because my tongue
spoke harshly, I said:
Make it dust.
                   And yet
it was not death, but
her body in its green dress
I longed for. That’s why
I stood for days in the field
until the grass turned black
and the rain came.

(Laurette in a Green Robe (Black Background), 1916
Henri Matisse (French, 1869–1954)
Oil on canvas; 28 3/4 x 21 3/8 in. (73 x 54.3 cm)

SELF-PORTRAIT AT TWENTY

By Gregory Orr


I stood inside myself
like a dead tree or a tower.
I pulled the rope
of braided hair
and high above me
a bell of leaves tolled.

Because my hand
stabbed its brother,
I said: Make it stone.

Because my tongue
spoke harshly, I said:
Make it dust.
And yet
it was not death, but
her body in its green dress
I longed for. That’s why
I stood for days in the field
until the grass turned black
and the rain came.

(Laurette in a Green Robe (Black Background), 1916
Henri Matisse (French, 1869–1954)
Oil on canvas; 28 3/4 x 21 3/8 in. (73 x 54.3 cm)

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

(Excerpt: The Divine Image by William Blake)

(A candle for Jackie; Vaiano, Italy; iphone 5)noonjava66

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

(Excerpt: The Divine Image by William Blake)

(A candle for Jackie; Vaiano, Italy; iphone 5)
noonjava66

Thank you!

Thank you to all the followers of The Ablest Navigators. Several new folks have come on board recently. Welcome! I hope you dig around the archives and find some things that interest you. Peace